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About this collection

Vox, first Vox Wesleyana, began as a serial for Wesley College to communicate news amongst its students, alumni, family, and friends, and to represent and promote its various academic and extracurricular activities.  Over time it evolved into what we would now call a yearbook.

The first issue of Vox Wesleyana was published January 1897 by a still-young Wesley College, in the midst of its first term in the new Portage Avenue campus.  It began putting out eight issues per year, one per month during the academic year, with an occasional midsummer number; the frequency, however, decreased over time.  An elected body of students and faculty served as an editoral board.  It published essays from the College's Literary, Religious, and Athletic societies; letters and editorials; and news from students or alumni.  During the Great War, Vox Wesleyana also kept a running list of its students and alumni that gave military service.

In the academic year of 1913-1914, Wesley College and Manitoba College ventured an administrative unity; for this year only, Vox Wesleyana and the Manitoba College Journal were replaced by a joint paper The Gleam.  The Colleges began to co-operate again after the Methodist and Presbytarian churches formed the United Church in 1925, with an informal unity of their own called United Colleges starting 1926.  Vox Wesleyana, therefore, changed its title to Vox in 1929.  

During World War 2 and after, as the unofficial United Colleges became the official United College and later University of Winnipeg, Vox gradually changed its format.  The student body was growing very quickly, too much to publish news about all its alumni and students.  

Improvements in printing and photography gave rise to a more visual than literary paradigm.  Creative writing, art, and photographs replaced essays and articles as content.  In the 1940s Vox published three issues per year; in the 1950s, only one.  By then it was a yearbook more than a journal, including portraits of students of all years.  A commemorative Centennial issue of Vox was published in 1971 with a gold cover.  It, and several issues thereafter, are almost entirely photographic, each page a collage of images with minimal text.  

By the 1980s, the University of Winnipeg had grown too large for a yearbook to be useful or practical.  An issue was published 1981, and a final one in 1985, and so ended nearly 100 years in print.

The Archives has a nearly complete run of Vox Wesleyana and Vox, but many of the early issues have been bound in hardcover and cannot be scanned without damaging their spines.  We have digitized, therefore, only those issues of which we have loose duplicates.  We have also, for the sake of protecting the privacy of individuals still living, only digitized up to 1949.  Interested researchers are welcome to visit in person to view any issue they cannot find in this digital collection.

 
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